Are Athletes at a Heightened Risk for Developing Gum Disease?

  • By lemaster
  • 21 Oct, 2016
Have you heard that athletes have terrible teeth? It many cases, this is actually true, as the sports drinks they consume and other behaviors can be hard on the mouth.

Read on to find out some of the main reasons that athletes are at a heightened risk for developing periodontal disease than their non-athlete peers, and use this information to keep your teeth safe.

Clenching and Grinding

Teeth clenching and grinding is a major problem experienced by athletes, especially those who don't wear mouth guards. When you are running or exerting yourself physically, it is natural that you might clench your teeth shut.

However, prolonged clenching can cause your teeth to wear away when they rub together, resulting in pain and movement of the teeth. Gum disease may also result.

Protein Bars
Like sugary snacks, protein bars and other food items that are heavy in carbs can damage your teeth and the gums, especially if you aren't keeping up on your oral hygiene.

When food particles are left over, these proteins can get stuck between the teeth, providing a great place for bacteria to breed and accumulate. If you don't floss to get this debris out of there, gum disease and other problems can result.

Sports Drinks
Athletes often choose sports drinks over water in the hopes that these beverages will restore lost carbohydrates and electrolytes. Not only are these drinks refreshing, but they are also flavorful.

In actuality, the water is just as good of an option, and it will also help to protect your teeth. Energy drinks are full of bacteria and sugars, all of which can contribute to cavities and gum disease.

If you are an athlete, it is especially important that you are visiting the dentist regularly. Call today to set up your appointment to make sure your athletic activities aren't harming your teeth.
By lemaster 21 Oct, 2016
Dental health researchers have long been examining the connection between gum disease and diabetes.

While it has been found that gum disease can have a negative effect on diabetes, some more encouraging news has been found - gum disease therapy an actually help you to control your blood sugar.
By lemaster 21 Oct, 2016
Brushing and flossing are the main ways you can reduce your risk of gum disease, but you may be wondering if including mouthwash in your oral hygiene routine has any benefits.

While mouthwash is not a magical elixir that will completely protect you from gum disease, it can be a useful tool to help reduce your risk or manage existing inflammation.
By lemaster 21 Oct, 2016
Receding gums are most commonly caused by gum disease - an infection that oftentimes develops from poor oral hygiene. If left unchecked, gum disease can result in gum and bone tissue loss and eventually tooth loss.

While gum disease is not curable, there are several ways to manage it and keep it from progressing further.
By lemaster 21 Oct, 2016
Have you heard that athletes have terrible teeth? It many cases, this is actually true, as the sports drinks they consume and other behaviors can be hard on the mouth.

Read on to find out some of the main reasons that athletes are at a heightened risk for developing periodontal disease than their non-athlete peers, and use this information to keep your teeth safe.
By lemaster 21 Oct, 2016
Perioscopy is a fairly new procedure that uses a tiny dental endoscope that contains advanced magnification, lighting, and video technology.

This system allows your dentist to diagnose and treat areas below the gums without surgery.

Since the technology is relatively new, many people have questions about this procedure.

By getting answers to some of these questions, you can better understand how the technology might be able to help you.
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